How To Name a Beneficiary for your DNA at FamilyTree DNA

I've written an updated blog with links to sample DNA Beneficiary forms called, "How to Name a DNA Beneficiary."

FamilyTree DNA is the only major testing site that currently provides an online directive and a printable form to name a beneficiary for your DNA. Someone will be making choices about how to handle your DNA when you die, so it makes sense for us to consider how we want our DNA used and then leave explicit instructions.

When you die, you may want your DNA

deleted permanentlyassigned to a beneficiary to manage so it can be used for matchesassigned to a beneficiary for other purposes including downloading the data for use on other sites or using your test sample for further DNA testing.

Whatever your desires, you should make them as explicit as possible because in the absence of your directive, many places are treating your digital assets as part of your estate and they are managed at the discretion of t…

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How to Download DNA Raw Data from FamilyTreeDNA

How to Download DNA Raw Data from FamilyTreeDNA   This site requires the fewest steps to get your data and is very simple if you can remember your login and password. Requirements: Know your FamilyTreeDNA kit number and password Have access to a secure computer with the ability to store and protect the data if you want an archival copy or delete the data after uploading to another drive or test site   Instructions:   Step 1 - Login to FamilyTreeDNA.com You need your DNA Kit number or your GAP Username and your password. I can never remember my kit number and don't have a GAP Username. (A GAP Username is short for "Group Administrator Page Username" for people who manage Group DNA projects.) I usually have to go back to my emails, search for "FamilyTreeDNA kit" and find the original email from FTDNA with my kit number. Also, in my case, an FTDNA  Kit number is usually 6 digits; if you've uploaded DNA from another test provider, that DNA kit numb…
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Quick & Dirty Family Trees for DNA Matches

Genealogists often build Quick & Dirty family trees (Q&D trees) for DNA matches who don't have linked family trees or for DNA matches whose trees aren't complete enough to help determine the family relationship.   I don't have the patience to build a tree for each tree-challenged DNA match, so I use a shortcut.  

Disclaimer.

I'm a hobbyist. My husband is a professional in the industry. Professional Genealogists probably consider this a very low-brow method partially because I'm using a public family tree that I didn't personally research and because the FamilySearch tree will have errors. When I research with my husband, he hands me a stack of these papers and tells me, "Document everything, especially failures." This isn't that; it's not original research. That's why the title includes the words "find" and "quick and dirty." I ain't doing the work. To some pros, this method is akin to dum…

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