FamilySearch turns 20!

FamilySearch turns 20 today! This free genealogy website started May 24, 1999 and hosts family history record collections from around the world. Celebrate 20 years of FamilySearch by trying their: free Family Treefree Historical Recordsfree Photo & Memory Gallery & appfree Digitized book collectionfree Family Tree keepsakesfree Family Tree Charts& more from FamilySearch partner apps! If you're new to genealogy, the site is always free but requires that you create an account to access some collections. Some offerings to check out include:

 

Free Family Tree their unified family tree - you can link yourself to the worldwide Family Tree by connecting to an ancestor who is already in the tree, or just start building your own tree for free on their site free record matching with automated hints to help you build your family tree

 

 

Search Search more than 2,000 collections of Historical Records for fr…
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How to Use Ancestry ThruLines™

Ancestry released a beta version of a new tool - ThruLines™ - at RootsTech SLC 2019. ThruLines™ is a great visual representation of people you may be related to, taken from your tree and other searchable trees at Ancestry (including DNA matches). For a limited time, anyone who has DNA tested with Ancestry has access to ThruLines™ without an Ancestry subscription (see the fine print).

 

ThruLines™ may become a great tool but it's also like leaving a kid in a candy store because they just took the simplest, most potentially unresearched material and put it all within easy grasp in a tempting display. I'm loving it! If you haven't felt the addictive pull of genealogy before, buckle up.

 

 

Who Can See ThruLines?

To see ThruLines at Ancestry you need to have:

Taken an AncestryDNA testChosen to see and be seen by your DNA MatchesMake sure your DNA test is correctly linked to a tree at AncestryMake sure your tree is sea…
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Is Your Tree Well-Sourced? A Free Visual Check Using a Fan Chart

FamilySearch has a Fan Chart display mode you can use as a visual aid to see if your tree has source citations for each person. The tree is color-coded; the darker the color, the more source citations. This is a great tool to help you see which family lines need more research and sourcing.

 

FamilySearch family trees are community-owned trees that anyone can change. That makes one person's research vulnerable to the human error of all others but can also make for a better-researched tree with multiple contributors.

 

 

A Well-Sourced Tree at FamilySearch

This is my husband's family tree. The color key for this chart is:

darkest orange color represents people with 10+ source citationsmedium orange represents 5-9 source citationslight orange represents 1-4 source citationswhite represents 0 (zero) source citations

As you can see from his tree, most of his tree is well-sourc…

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