Maintenance Essentials for Genealogy

I've had maintenance on the mind this summer. So many friends and family are dealing with problems that are largely a result of lack of maintenance. It's made me think how easy it is to lose all our gains, simply because we don't do the day-to-day and month-to-month maintenance projects.

Why am I doing massive fence repairs in July? How'd we regain all this weight?How did the sewer line break?

It goes on and on. So while I work on projects and have to set aside my family history, I'm assessing what are the maintenance essentials for genealogy in my home.

We made some incredible family history gains last year, digitizing everything (photos, papers, cassette tapes) for my side of the family and we're close to finishing this for Mike's side of the family. I can't afford to lose these gains. Here are some ideas for projects we need to either start, finish, or maintain.

 

 

Some Family History Maintenance Ideas

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Where to Find Historical Books for Genealogy and Family History

I was surfing Pinterest today and found "The Servantless House" by R. Randal Phillips, written after WWI, when many women had transitioned to factory jobs and there was a shortage of domestic help and increased costs for anyone hiring domestic help.  

"Already we have a Women's Legion which demands not only a very much higher rate of wage for domestic work than ever was paid in the old days, but also makes it a stipulation that a girl shall have specified times for her meals, during which she is not to be disturbed; two hours off every day; and every Sunday off from after dinner till 10 o'clock at night..."   Not only did servants start demanding breaks for meals and a few hours off each day, they also now demanded,  

"proper sleeping accommodation and adequate food."   The horror!  

"All this, quite obviously, intensifies an already very difficult pro…

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Using Recipes in your Family Histories

    It's planting season again and gardening, cooking, and canning are in my DNA.   I garden and can for pleasure but my ancestors gardened and canned out of necessity.   Here's how my father-in-law described it. "Grandma and Grandpa didn’t have an easy life. They had a garden in Gunnison they used to work day and night. They needed to grow enough in that garden to live year round. Other than a little meat they purchased, they lived off the garden. I don’t remember them having pigs or chickens or animals of any kind. They grew all kinds of potatoes and fruit trees and everything they could grow they harvested themselves. They had a big storage shelter down in the ground with wood around it and dirt on the top and they stored all this food down there to last through the winter."   Rather than feel sorry for my ancestors and their plight (which I do), I'm going to record and share the memories of these ancestors who lived off the land and the w…
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