United States Census 1900 is a free collection at FamilySearch with a name-searchable index and images with records of people living in the United States in 1900. This was the twelfth national census.

 

The searchable index covers all states including the Armed Forces (foreign country where census occurred) and the Indian Territory. Images can also be viewed using the browse option and includes all states including the Armed Forces (foreign country where census occurred) and the Indian Territory.

 

You’ll need to be logged in with a free FamilySearch account to search these records. It’s easy to register for a free account at FamilySearch.

 

 

What Can I Learn from Census Records?

 

These records may include:

  • State, county, township, and enumeration district where census was taken
  • Street address and house number
  • Name of head of household
  • Names of all members of household
  • Relationship to head of household
  • Race
  • Gender
  • Month and year of birth
  • Age
  • Marital status
  • Number of years married
  • Number of children born to mother
  • Number of children still living
  • Each household member’s birthplace
  • Birthplace of person’s father
  • Birthplace of person’s mother
  • Year of immigration and number of years in the United States
  • Whether a naturalized citizen: Al Alien; Pa Papers; Na Naturalized
  • Occupation
  • Months attended school
  • Whether member can, read, write and speak English

Territory of Alaska census

  • Tribe and clan
  • Date of locating to Alaska
  • Occupation in Alaska
  • Post office address at home

Native American Census Form NARA Census Sample Form Native American

  • Indian name
  • Tribe of the individual and names of their parents
  • Percentage of white blood
  • If married, whether living in polygamy
  • Whether taxed
  • Year of citizenship
  • Whether citizenship was acquired by land allotment

Hawaiian Islands census

  • Year of immigration and number of years lived in the Hawaiian Islands

Military and Navy census

  • Name of military, naval station, or vessel
  • Company or troop, regiment, and arm of service
  • Rank grade or class
  • Residence in the United States

 

How Can Census Records Help Me Find Other Records?

 

With information from these records you may be able to:

  • Use the age listed to determine an approximate birth date. This date along with the place of birth can help you find a birth record. Birth records often list biographical and marital details about the parents and close relatives other than the immediate family
  • Use the race information to find records related to that ethnicity such as records of the Freedman’s Bureau or Indian censuses
  • Use the naturalization information to find their naturalization papers in the county court records. It can also help you locate immigration records such as a passenger list which would usually be kept records at the port of entry into the United States
  • Birth places can tell you former residences and can help to establish a migration pattern for the family
  • It is often helpful to extract the information on all families with the same surname in the same general area. If the surname is uncommon, it is likely that those living in the same area were related
  • Be sure to extract all families before you look at other records. The relationships given will help you to organize family groups. The family groupings will help you identify related families when you discover additional information in other records
  • Married family members may have lived nearby but in a separate household so you may want to search an entire town, neighboring towns, or even a county
  • You may be able to identify an earlier generation if elderly parents were living with or close by a married child
  • You may be able to identify a younger generation if a young married couple still lived with one of their sets of parents
  • Additional searches may be needed to locate all members of a particular family in the census
  • The census may identify persons for whom other records do not exist

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