United States, Native American, Census Rolls, 1885-1940 is a free collection at FamilySearch with a name-searchable index for the Native American censuses of various American Indian tribes. These also include some Native American birth and death indexes.

 

You’ll need to be logged in with a free FamilySearch account to search these records. It’s easy to register for a free account at FamilySearch.

 

 

What Can I Learn from Census Schedules?

 

The record content varies by year, but the census records generally contain the following:

  • Indian name
  • English name
  • Sex
  • Age
  • Relationship
  • Tribe
  • Reservation.
  • Current year’s roll number
  • Previous year’s roll number
  • A few of the censuses show the names of persons who were born or died during the year, along with date of birth and death.

 

Beginning in 1929, the following was added:

  • An annuity or allotment number is included if the tribe receives an annuity or allotment

 

Beginning in 1930, the following was added:

  • Surname
  • Given name
  • Degree of blood
  • Jurisdiction where enrolled
  • Name of the post office, county, and state
  • May list how many live or stillbirths a woman had

 

Birth records:

  • Census roll number (if born before the census was taken)
  • Full name
  • Birth date
  • If born live
  • Sex
  • Tribe
  • Degree of Indian blood
  • Parents degree of Indian blood
  • If living at jurisdiction where enrolled
  • If living at another jurisdiction and where
  • If living off reservation and where

 

Death records:

  • Census roll year and number
  • Full name
  • Death date
  • Age
  • Sex
  • Tribe
  • Degree of Indian blood
  • Cause of death
  • If living at jurisdiction where enrolled
  • If living at another jurisdiction and where

 

How Can Census Records Help Me Find Other Records?

 

With information from these records you may be able to:

  • Copy the citation, in case you need to find this record again later.
  • Use the ages listed to determine approximate birth dates and find the family in additional censuses.
  • Use the information found in the record to find church and vital records such as birth, baptism, marriage, and death records.
  • Use the information found in the record to find land, probate or other agency records.
  • Repeat this process with additional family members found, to find more generations of the family.

 

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